Write-0-Rama!

What is a limerick? http://pbskids.org/arthur/games/poetry/limerick.html

National Writing Project: http://www.nwp.org/

Ralph Fletcher’s Website: http://ralphfletcher.com/tips.html

Poem-In-Your-Pocket Day April 29, 2010:

http://www.poets.org/page.php/prmID/406

http://www.webenglishteacher.com/6traits.html

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/comma-splice.aspx

http://www.nwrel.org/assessment/prompts.php?odelay=2&d=1&prompt=4#prompt

Word of the Day:

From Merriam Webster On Line Dictionary:

jacquerie • \zhah-kuh-REE\  • noun
: a peasants’ revolt

Example sentence:
“In light of inadequate social safety nets and the probability of further economic turndowns, the regime’s fear of an anti-government jacquerie is not far-fetched.” (David Aikman, The American Spectator, March 2000)

Did you know?
The first jacquerie was an insurrection of peasants against the nobility in northeastern France in 1358, so-named from the nobles’ habit of referring contemptuously to any peasant as “Jacques,” or “Jacques Bonhomme.” It took some time — 150 years — for the name of the first jacquerie to become a generalized term for other revolts. The term is also occasionally used to refer to the peasant class, as when Madame Defarge in Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities tells her husband to “consider the faces of all the world that we know, consider the rage and discontent to which the Jacquerie addresses itself with more and more of certainty every hour.”

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 31, 2009 is:

daedal • \DEE-dul\  • adjective
1 *a : skillful, artistic b : intricate 2 : adorned with many things

Example sentence:
The filmmaker makes daedal use of lighting effects and camera angles to create a noirish atmosphere.

Did you know?
You might know Daedalus as the mythological prisoner who fashioned wings of feathers and wax to escape from the island of Crete with his son Icarus. But it was as architect and sculptor, one said to have designed a labyrinth for King Minos on Crete, that he earned his name. “Daedalus” (from Greek “daidalos”) is Latin for “skillfully wrought.” The same skillful Latin adjective gave English the adjectives “daedal” (in use since the 16th century) and “Daedalian” (or “Daedalean”), a synonym of “daedal.”

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence. 

jacquerie • \zhah-kuh-REE\  • noun
: a peasants’ revolt

Example sentence:
“In light of inadequate social safety nets and the probability of further economic turndowns, the regime’s fear of an anti-government jacquerie is not far-fetched.” (David Aikman, The American Spectator, March 2000)

Did you know?
The first jacquerie was an insurrection of peasants against the nobility in northeastern France in 1358, so-named from the nobles’ habit of referring contemptuously to any peasant as “Jacques,” or “Jacques Bonhomme.” It took some time — 150 years — for the name of the first jacquerie to become a generalized term for other revolts. The term is also occasionally used to refer to the peasant class, as when Madame Defarge in Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities tells her husband to “consider the faces of all the world that we know, consider the rage and discontent to which the Jacquerie addresses itself with more and more of certainty every hour.”

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for August 31, 2009 is: 

daedal • \DEE-dul\  • adjective
1 *a : skillful, artistic b : intricate 2 : adorned with many things

 

 

Example sentence:
The filmmaker makes daedal use of lighting effects and camera angles to create a noirish atmosphere.

Did you know?
You might know Daedalus as the mythological prisoner who fashioned wings of feathers and wax to escape from the island of Crete with his son Icarus. But it was as architect and sculptor, one said to have designed a labyrinth for King Minos on Crete, that he earned his name. “Daedalus” (from Greek “daidalos”) is Latin for “skillfully wrought.” The same skillful Latin adjective gave English the adjectives “daedal” (in use since the 16th century) and “Daedalian” (or “Daedalean”), a synonym of “daedal.”

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.

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