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Visible invisibilia

Now you see it: Ready for ELA…(documents below)
Now you don’t: Transition to just Computer Technology…

Why are teachers fatigued? I’m wondering if there is a psychological profile that suits most educators: it depends on their position in the hierarchy of the organization, perhaps, and what teaching and educational philosophies/best practices/research that inform their own bias and practice. Do we trend toward empathetic, competitive, creative souls? Are we perfectionists, visionaries, or psychopaths? I am not sure. I do know, to date, until our robot overlords show themselves, we are humans. We carry experiences, baggage, insights that no one else knows. We extend our hands, show our tears and share our laughter; but, if someone is determined to be cut off from the humanity of education, there is not much anyone can do or say.

I do know, to date, until our robot overlords show themselves, we are humans. We carry experiences, baggage, insights that no one else knows. Everyone has a story to tell. We extend our hands, show our tears and share our laughter; but, if someone is determined to be cut off from the humanity of education, there is not much anyone can do or say. Think of the Dolores Umbridges of the world: that archetype of pragmatic agendas, grinding into the skin and drawing scars and blood. We villainize and protest: think about Betsy Devos and her ilk. Think about how she can wrap herself in tweed and money, put on pearls and shrimp-colored lipstick, and learn how to say the right things to make others believe, bring them to her side, kindly gutting the system.

Think of the Dolores Umbridges of the world: that archetype of pragmatic agendas, grinding into the skin and drawing scars and blood. We villainize and protest: think about Betsy Devos and her ilk. Think about how she can wrap herself in tweed and money, put on pearls and shrimp-colored lipstick, and learn how to say the right things to make others believe, bring them to her side, kindly gutting the system.

I can’t know Betsy Devos’ true heart. I can’t truly understand her background or motivation. Not coming from wealth or being in that echelon, I can no more know her or her me. Dolores didn’t care to know Harry, and we all know how that turned out.

But I’m just musing this morning– there are beautiful stars right over my head. Orion showed himself strong and infinite. Venus flirted with the moon. And under my feet, in the southern hemisphere, golden heavens took their tea and sang their songs. It’s been a good week. Students are connecting, many of my colleagues are supportive, and I will continue to share.

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Fluff the Knickers.

“There’s truth in every story told.” –Neil Gaiman

Last spring, when I made a commitment to my administration that I would create, develop and lead curriculum and classes for the critical and important vision of bringing technology instruction for our students; however, I wasn’t quite ready to give up ELA. I hoped to be able to continue my work in ELA and at least have one class. But it wasn’t meant to be, and I even knew it last year. Some instinct whispered to me, but I ignored it. Something didn’t sit right, but it wouldn’t have mattered anyway. My premonitions are usually accurate: it’s my lack of ability to stop or mend potential events where I struggle. English/Language Arts pumps my teaching heart with blood and purpose for the past eleven years: curriculum leader for five years, collaborative teams, professional development, hours of my own blogging, writing, research: every time a test changed or standards flowed in, I took it as a personal challenge to grow and adapt, all in order to help my students grow and adapt. I am not an outwardly competitive person (which I think confuses competitive people: I am my harshest critic), but my internalized coach is demanding. I have not found a teaching problem that can’t be solved with discussion, reading, trying: isolation is its kryptonite, however. Teaching is breathing: no oxygen = death.

If you take the time to read the thread above when I found out a week into the school year I wouldn’t be able to keep the ELA class, that hit me hard. The repercussions of this meant I wouldn’t be able to meet with beloved colleagues during PLCs and continue the work we’ve created in any formal way. The thousands of dollars of books, the Lord of the Flies unit, the planning, the money, the time, the curriculum –hours of the years, and the summer–stopped. Continuity and conversations: muted.

So when I process and grieve that due to numbers, budgets, and hard decisions that may or may not be in the process behind the scenes for over a year and I lost my one ELA class, please understand that need to reflect and process, but I will remain strong. And — full disclosure: the computer technology work I’ve been doing parallel these past eleven years, too, is also my heart. This is going to be very powerful indeed. I have my friend John Spencer in our decade-long digital friendship and discussion, my colleagues who know me, I share willingly and listen with open ears. My curiosity is a gift.

As I write this, pour a cup of coffee, I realize I am lucky, maybe even blessed, not cursed: our district is in big financial trouble. Being a building union representative, I’ve monitored this issue for some time now. We teachers and our building administration are justifiably scared. With fear comes an outward display of anger. From the information we’ve listened to in horror at union meetings, a few dozen teachers were forced to move to positions they didn’t want, or have the necessary credentials for. Trust me: if the district moved me to a calculus classroom parents could sue for educational malpractice. There isn’t enough Khan Academy in the world to catch me up in that content area.

But as my friend and mentor said, good teaching is good teaching. I am fortunate that my style and approach has never been concrete-content driven, but big picture learning. We create scientists, mathematicians, historians, journalist, writers, readers, and thinkers. I’m looking forward to continuing this work.

The Great Handshake started a series on teacher hacks. While the word ‘hack’ connotes a modern sense of coolness and ingenuity, it doesn’t really serve the powerful message of the posts. “Conferences that work” artfully and subtly underscores how data has gone wrong in a few powerful sentences: (typos are the writer’s: pay not attention)

“My principal and I have started to call these meetings “data chats.” At first, I thought that was a great name. But then, as is often the case, adults started to ruin the word “data.” People start to think that we are turning kids into numbers and charts, and forgetting the humanity that makes teaching and learning so challenging and meaningful.

But this kind of data is full of humanity. In fact, on countless occasions, students have cried about challenging years while recounting why certain times in their school experience were harder than others. Teachers have to be prepared to hear about pain that students should never have to endure, and reasons why they failed all of their classes a given year. At other times, students laugh as they remember middle school, goofing off, and all of that pre-pubescent confusion. During these conferences teachers morph from planners of individual instruction, to listeners and amatuer councelors, to friends, to mentors, to motivators and to all the other roles wedged in between those.”

Read some of his comments and noticings for the student. If I were her, there is no way I would leave that conversation without finding my dignity, integrity and moreover, power again. She is a lucky student.

But it shouldn’t take “luck.” Conferencing, relationships, conversations and heartfelt, sincerity supports all of us, teachers and students alike.Our building is fortunate to have strong leadership now. However, if we don’t have a role model or leader who promotes warmth and fairness amongst the staff, we must steal it for ourselves in order to have the strength to have the loving, difficult conversations with students. To reframe and refocus: “Yes, you are more than a test score. And here is why.

What I research, read, think about, write about: all of that may not mean anything to the district, administration, or leaders. They have their own purposes and to-do lists. So, I’ll continue to grow back my tails, fluff my knickers, and carry on.

I have important work to do:

No Longer a Luxury: Digital Literacy Can’t Wait

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1srYlGLpB-Xck57Uj8P4DDjh1wSSqVcFA6m8FTMsYUTk/edit?usp=sharing

 

 

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Depleted.

Maybe it’s the end of the world: maybe it’s the real and present threats to my students and my country from the inside, and maybe it’s a huge bundle of folks not listening, asking questions, and using creativity and resourcefulness to craft solutions, but I am feeling dang cranky this morning. There are nitpicking issues, and the usual miscommunications, but those are inconsequential and self-serving.

I wish: 

Every educator who voted for Trump would renounce him. I can forgive that you wanted change. I can almost forgive that you listened to years of vitriol about Hillary Clinton from your right-wing nutjob media sources and felt assured in your stances and opinions. But what I cannot forgive now is your complicity and ignorance in the face of overwhelming evidence.

Every friend or family member who is not writing to Congress now, calling, or telling those they voted for this will not stand. This is not a liberal or conservative issue. We are being attacked by domestic terrorists and fascists on our own soil. Treat these traitors as you would any foreign threat.

To every district in the nation, it is time to speak up. Take a stand. There are no two sides here. We do not want a white supremacist nation or whatever hellscape vision of racism and jack-booted dystopia you believe you are entitled to. Others receiving help does not mean you are less or being taken from. Once YOU UNDERSTAND THAT YOU WILL BE FREE.

If you practice a faith, do a gut-check about what your faith is. If your faith includes cognitive dissonance, hatred, racism, bigotry, then you’re already in your version of Hell, and you’re taking the rest of us with you. My personal beliefs bear no weight here, and my conscience is clear.

I and others will fight you as the enemy you are. And when you’re ready to surrender your tired ideas of hate, we will treat with you, call a truce, and work to bring peace back to our nation.

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Saving Summer: Nevertheless, She Persisted

My path is mine.

There is much to write, yet, I am in mute-mode. My planning and crafting of the curriculum are in a holding pattern until I hear more of what admin asks of me. This September is the 10-year anniversary of this blog. Summer is over, but there better beginnings are rising. Be patient with me.

 

PS Oh: and reason number 1,218 why I love being a Language Arts teacher: satire and parody: